Image Spring 2013


Eating for better health

It is true: Eating nutritious foods can help you combat a variety of diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, and promote better health. You can look better and feel better, too, when you follow a healthy eating plan.


Try some of the following foods and start enjoying the benefits (and flavors!).


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Berries. According to the American Cancer Society, foods rich in vitamin C may lower the risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C; raspberries and blackberries are good sources, too. They are also low in calories and high in fiber.

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Cruciferous vegetables. Vegetables in this family contain compounds called glucosinolates, which are being studied for possible anticancer effects. A new study shows that compounds in cruciferous vegetables can target and kill cancer cells while leaving normal, healthy cells unaffected. The family includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, radishes, turnips and watercress.

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Nuts. Almonds are rich in vitamin E, an antioxidant that may help protect against heart disease and promote brain health. Research suggests that nutrients such as vitamin E may be important in lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Nuts are high in protein and fiber (but also in fat, so watch portion sizes).

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Nuts. Almonds are rich in vitamin E, an antioxidant that may help protect against heart disease and promote brain health. Research suggests that nutrients such as vitamin E may be important in lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Nuts are high in protein and fiber (but also in fat, so watch portion sizes).


Enjoy these oatmeal pecan waffles (or pancakes)


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Ingredients


Waffles:

1 cup whole-wheat flour
½ cup quick-cooking oats
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ cup unsalted pecans, chopped
2 large eggs, separated (for pancakes, see note)
1½ cups fat-free (skim) milk
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Fruit topping:

2 cups fresh strawberries, rinsed, stems removed, cut in half (or use frozen strawberries, thawed)
1 cup fresh blackberries, rinsed (or use frozen blackberries, thawed)
1 cup fresh blueberries, rinsed (or use frozen blueberries, thawed)
1 teaspoon powdered sugar

Directions


Image Preheat waffle iron (or griddle, if making pancakes).


Image Combine flour, oats, baking powder, sugar and pecans in a large bowl.


Image Combine egg yolks, milk and vegetable oil in a separate bowl, and mix well.


Image Add liquid mixture to the dry ingredients and stir together. Do not overmix; mixture should be a bit lumpy.


Image Whip egg whites to medium peaks. Gently fold egg whites into batter (for pancakes, see note).


Image Pour batter into preheated waffle iron and cook until the waffle iron light signals the waffle is done or steam stops coming out of the iron. Or make pancakes on a preheated griddle.


Image Top each waffle with mixed berries and a light dusting of powdered sugar, and serve.


Note:

For pancakes, do not separate eggs. Mix whole eggs with milk and oil, and eliminate step 5.

Serves 4. Per serving: 340 calories, 11 g fat, 107 mg cholesterol, 9 g fiber, 14 g protein, 50 g carbohydrates, 369 mg potassium, 331 mg sodium

Recipe adapted from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.


Start a healthy year!


For in-depth diet management or nutritional services, contact MaryEllen Vivrett, MS, RD, LD, Clinical Nutrition Manager at Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas, at (409) 212-7229 or email maryellen.vivrett@bhset.net.



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